Elliott House of Studies

For the Formation of Clergy in the Tradition of Classical Anglicanism

2015 Seminar

Elliott House of Studies, 27-29 January 2015

General
The 16th century reformation crucible of classical Anglicanism is usually thought of deeply Augustinian in its theological roots and character.  Less recognized is the influence of the 5th century Eastern Church Father Dionysius, which this seminar will discuss.   The seminar will be ‘practical’ in that we shall read together the Dionysian corpus and selections from Richard Hooker’s Of the Lawes of Ecclesiasticall Politie to consider the relation of Denys to Reformed theology. We conclude with a reading of Lawes Book V. 50-58, considering Dionysian influence on Hooker’s understanding of the Sacraments.

Denys
Read: Pseudo-Dionysius: the Complete Works, The Classics of Western Spirituality, trans. Colm Luibheid, Paulist Press, 1987. (New edition 2002). This is often more a paraphrase than a translation, but is easily accessible and reads well. We shall quickly read through and review the logic of the entire corpus.

Hooker
Read: Of the Lawes of Ecclesiasticall Politie, Books I and V.50-58.  In the past decade Hooker’s debt to Dionysian cosmology has been highlighted by scholars such as Torrance Kirby. (Cf. esp. Lawes, Books I-IV, and VIII.)

This dependence will be observed in our reading of Book I of the Lawes. But when it comes to Hooker’s treatment of the sacraments in Book V the most common suggestion is that ‘Dionysian mediation’ falls away to ‘Augustinian immediacy’. In the light of this understanding, we shall consider to what extent, if any, Hooker’s notion of ‘participation’ in his treatment of the sacraments (Lawes Book V, esp. sections 50-58) retains Dionysian themes.

Method
I will not be lecturing but rather guiding the conversation as we read Denys and Hooker. Note: Neoplatonic philosophy was well known to the Reformers (its reception by Luther and Hooker especially is of interest to us) not only in its Dionysian form. Furthermore, Dionysius himself is often mediated to Hooker through others, esp. Aquinas. (Cf. The relation of the structure of Book I of the Lawes and Aquinas’ treatment of law in Summa Theologiae, Part II, qq 90-97.) Nonetheless, we shall limit ourselves to the question of the influence of themes we shall identify in our reading of Denys himself upon Hooker’s understanding of our participation in Christ through the Sacraments.

Registration
The registration fee of $45.00 may be paid upon arrival or mailed to:

Elliott House of Studies
Attn. Jessica Osborne
1 West Macon Street
Savannah, GA 31410

Questions?  email Jessica

The Daily Schedule 2015

Monday 26 January

5:30 Evening Prayer (in the Chapel)
6:15 Cocktails at the Rectory

Tuesday 27 January

8:15 Morning Prayer
8:45 Green-Meldrim House (1st floor)
9:00-12:00 Seminar Green-Meldrim House (2nd floor)
12:00 Break for lunch
2:00-5:00 Seminar
5:30 Evening Prayer
7:00 Dinner at the Green-Meldrim House


The schedules for Wednesday and Thursday will be the same as Tuesday, without the dinner.


Wednesday 28 January

8:15 Morning Prayer
8:45 Green-Meldrim House (1st floor)
9:00-12:00 Seminar Green-Meldrim House (2nd floor)
12:00 Break for lunch
2:00-5:00 Seminar
5:30 Evening Prayer

Thursday 29 January

8:15 Morning Prayer
8:45 Green-Meldrim House (1st floor)
9:00-12:00 Seminar Green-Meldrim House (2nd floor)
12:00 Break for lunch
2:00-5:00 Seminar
5:30 Evening Prayer

Accommodations & Transportation

If you need assistance with transportation from the Savannah airport, or accommodations while in Savannah don’t hesitate to contact us.  Because participants have generally preferred to make their own arrangements for the seminar, only a small block of rooms have been reserved.  If you need a listing of hotels near St. John’s please click here.